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.mino.japan.1992.

 


 

press release

Montreal Gazette
DATE: October 24, 1992


Quebec artist Kent Benson, has been awarded the bronze prize at the prestigious International Ceramics Festival '92 in Mino, Japan. Over 3000 entries from 52 countries were submitted to the triennial Mino competition. Eminent artists and designers from Japan, Finland, Germany, Italy, Switerzland, and the United States comprised the international jury.  The award was given for a teapot distinguished by its innovative contemporary design. Mr. Benson also received honorable mention for his second submission ,"Tea for Two" , a contemporary tea bowl. The award is accompanied by a 300,000 yen ($2,500 cdn) cash prize.

 Widely acknowledged to be a pivotal contributor to modern Quebec ceramics, Benson's career spans three decades. He is highly regarded for his tactile wood-fired work.

 In recent years he has been working to synthesize his interest in physics, mathematics, and computing with his work in clay.  The award-winning teapot is a result of this synthesis.  The teapot's form is inspired by mathematical concepts found in theoretical physics.  The design and development was computer generated. "Computers in the hands of experienced artists, "Benson says, "can and will contribute to future works of art."


Mr. Benson's latest work will be shown through November 14 at Galerie Barbara Silverberg in Montreal .  This work is particularly striking for its elegance and clarity of form.  "The pieces are intriguing," Ms Silverberg says, "for the juxtaposition of symbols in modern physics with elements found in ancient Islamic ceramic art and architecture." Islamic art is marked by its underlying mathematical structure and use of calligraphy.

Benson lives in Stanstead, Quebec  and is presently an instructor at John Abbott College and Concordia University in Montreal.

"The work", says Benson,  "points both to the past and the future."

 

FROM:            Barbara Silverberg

                        Galerie Barbara Silverberg

                        Contemporary Ceramics

                        Montreal (Quebec)